Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2015 May-Jun;37(3):273.e5-7. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2015.02.003. Epub 2015 Feb 23.

Pernicious anemia presenting as catatonia: correlating vitamin B12 levels and catatonic symptoms.

Author information

1
EPSM des Flandres, Bailleul, France; Department of Psychiatry, CHU Lille, Lille, France. Electronic address: damien.bram@gmail.com.
2
Université Lille Nord de France, Lille, France; Department of Psychiatry, CHU Lille, Lille, France. Electronic address: maxime.bubrovszky@chru-lille.fr.
3
EPSM des Flandres, Bailleul, France. Electronic address: Jean-Paul.Durand@epsm-des-flandres.com.
4
Université Lille Nord de France, Lille, France; Department of Internal Medicine, National Reference Center for Rare Autoimmune and Systemic Diseases, CHRU Lille, Lille, France. Electronic address: guillaume.lefevre@chru-lille.fr.
5
Université Lille Nord de France, Lille, France; Department of Internal Medicine, National Reference Center for Rare Autoimmune and Systemic Diseases, CHRU Lille, Lille, France. Electronic address: sandrine.dubois@chru-lille.fr.
6
Université Lille Nord de France, Lille, France; Department of Psychiatry, CHU Lille, Lille, France. Electronic address: guillaume.vaiva@chru-lille.fr.

Abstract

Pernicious anemia has been associated with various psychiatric manifestations, such as depression, mania and psychosis. Psychiatric symptoms can sometimes occur without hematological and neurological abnormalities and can be prodromal of vitamin B12 deficiency. We report a case of autoimmune B12 deficiency presenting as catatonia without signs of anemia or macrocytosis, in which a correlation was found between the patient's B12 blood levels and catatonic symptoms over time. This catatonic episode was successfully treated with only lorazepam and adequate doses of cyanocobalamin.

KEYWORDS:

Catatonia; Psychiatry; Vitamin B12 deficiency; Vitamins

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center