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Neuroscience. 2015 Nov 19;309:51-67. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.03.006. Epub 2015 Mar 12.

Hippocampal plasticity during the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Medical Center, Department of Neurobiology, Phoenix, AZ 85013, United States. Electronic address: elliott.mufson@dignityhealth.org.
2
Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Medical Center, Department of Neurobiology, Phoenix, AZ 85013, United States.
3
Department of Translational Science & Molecular Medicine, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, MI, United States.
4
Division of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States.
5
Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
6
Center for Dementia Research, Nathan Kline Institute, Departments of Psychiatry and Physiology & Neuroscience, New York University Langone Medical Center, Orangeburg, NY, United States.
7
Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
8
Sanders Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, United States.

Abstract

Neuroplasticity involves molecular and structural changes in central nervous system (CNS) throughout life. The concept of neural organization allows for remodeling as a compensatory mechanism to the early pathobiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in an attempt to maintain brain function and cognition during the onset of dementia. The hippocampus, a crucial component of the medial temporal lobe memory circuit, is affected early in AD and displays synaptic and intraneuronal molecular remodeling against a pathological background of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition and intracellular neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in the early stages of AD. Here we discuss human clinical pathological findings supporting the concept that the hippocampus is capable of neural plasticity during mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a prodromal stage of AD and early stage AD.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; degeneration; hippocampus; mild cognitive impairment; neurotrophins; plasticity

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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