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Appetite. 2015 Jul;90:136-43. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.03.010. Epub 2015 Mar 12.

The satiating effects of eggs or cottage cheese are similar in healthy subjects despite differences in postprandial kinetics.

Author information

1
CRNH-IdF, UMR914 - Joint Research Unit for Nutrition Physiology and Ingestive Behaviour, INRA, F-75005 Paris, France; CRNH-IdF, UMR914 - Joint Research Unit for Nutrition Physiology and Ingestive Behavior, AgroParisTech, F-75005 Paris, France.
2
UMR 1253 - Joint Research Unit for the Science and Technology and Milk and Eggs, Agrocampus-Ouest-INRA, F-35000 Rennes, France.
3
UMR 1019 - Joint Research Unit for Human Nutrition, INRA, F-63122 Saint Genès Champanelle, France; UFR Médecine, UMR 1019 - Joint Research Unit for Human Nutrition, Univ Clermont 1, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France.
4
UMR518- Joint Research Unit for Mathématiques et Informatique Appliquées, INRA, F-75005 Paris, France; UMR518- Joint Research Unit for Mathématiques et Informatique Appliquées, AgroParisTech, F-75005 Paris, France.
5
CRNH-IdF, UMR914 - Joint Research Unit for Nutrition Physiology and Ingestive Behaviour, INRA, F-75005 Paris, France; CRNH-IdF, UMR914 - Joint Research Unit for Nutrition Physiology and Ingestive Behavior, AgroParisTech, F-75005 Paris, France. Electronic address: Claire.Gaudichon@agroparistech.fr.

Abstract

Studies have reported a better satiating effect of eggs when compared with common cereal-based breakfasts, an effect that can be attributed to their macronutrient composition. Our aim was to compare the satiating power of an omelette and cottage cheese, both being common food snacks with similar nutrient compositions (containing proteins and lipids) but in different food forms. Thirty healthy volunteers participated in a randomized crossover trial. On each test day, the subjects consumed one of the two snacks, both providing 1346 kJ, 26 g protein, 21 g lipids, and 8 g lactose. The elapsed time between the snack and lunch request, their food intake at lunch, and their satiety scores were recorded. In a subgroup of 10 volunteers, blood was sampled to measure plasma metabolites and hormones. The two preloads were similar in terms of the time between the snack and a request for the buffet (167 ± 8 min), energy intake at the buffet (3988 ± 180 kJ) and appetite ratings. Plasma amino acid and urea concentrations indicated a marked delay in kinetic delivery after the eggs compared with the cottage cheese. In contrast, glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol displayed similar profiles after the snack. GIP and insulin secretions increased significantly after the cottage cheese, while glucagon and GLP-1 secretions were delayed with the omelette. We conclude that despite important differences in protein kinetics and their subsequent effects on hormone secretion, eggs and cottage cheese had a similar satiating power. This strongly suggests that with dose of proteins that is compatible to supplement strategies, i.e. 20-30 g, a modulation of protein kinetics is ineffective in increasing satiety.

KEYWORDS:

Dietary protein; Food form; Humans; Postprandial waves; Satiety

PMID:
25772196
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2015.03.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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