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Adv Healthc Mater. 2015 Nov 18;4(16):2530-2556. doi: 10.1002/adhm.201400781. Epub 2015 Mar 13.

Fabricated Elastin.

Author information

1
Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
2
School of Molecular Bioscience, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
3
Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
#
Contributed equally

Erratum in

Abstract

The mechanical stability, elasticity, inherent bioactivity, and self-assembly properties of elastin make it a highly attractive candidate for the fabrication of versatile biomaterials. The ability to engineer specific peptide sequences derived from elastin allows the precise control of these physicochemical and organizational characteristics, and further broadens the diversity of elastin-based applications. Elastin and elastin-like peptides can also be modified or blended with other natural or synthetic moieties, including peptides, proteins, polysaccharides, and polymers, to augment existing capabilities or confer additional architectural and biofunctional features to compositionally pure materials. Elastin and elastin-based composites have been subjected to diverse fabrication processes, including heating, electrospinning, wet spinning, solvent casting, freeze-drying, and cross-linking, for the manufacture of particles, fibers, gels, tubes, sheets and films. The resulting materials can be tailored to possess specific strength, elasticity, morphology, topography, porosity, wettability, surface charge, and bioactivity. This extraordinary tunability of elastin-based constructs enables their use in a range of biomedical and tissue engineering applications such as targeted drug delivery, cell encapsulation, vascular repair, nerve regeneration, wound healing, and dermal, cartilage, bone, and dental replacement.

KEYWORDS:

biomaterials; elastin; elastin-like peptides; fabrication; tissue engineering; tropoelastin

PMID:
25771993
PMCID:
PMC4568180
DOI:
10.1002/adhm.201400781
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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