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Ann Epidemiol. 2015 Jul;25(7):492-8. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.01.010. Epub 2015 Jan 31.

Cardiovascular correlates of platelet count and volume in the Framingham Heart Study.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Human Genomics Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Framingham, MA; Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.
2
Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Human Genomics Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Framingham, MA; College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston.
3
Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Human Genomics Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Framingham, MA. Electronic address: johnsonad2@nhlbi.nih.gov.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Platelet count and volume are inexpensive, routinely assayed biomarkers associated with cardiovascular health, but specific relationships among platelet indices, cardiovascular risk factors, and disease warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to understand associations among platelet count, volume, and 20 cardiovascular health-related variables in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS).

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analyses were performed on platelet count and volume associations with cardiovascular health indicators in three FHS cohorts (original n = 964, offspring n = 2699, and third generation n = 2419) using multivariate linear regression analysis. Time-to-event analysis was used for cardiovascular disease-related event incidences using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for age and sex.

RESULTS:

Results were concordant with the hypothesis that higher platelet counts are associated with less favorable cardiovascular risk profiles, although mean platelet volume associations were weaker. In our analysis, increased platelet count across FHS cohorts was consistently associated with smoking, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol levels. Some associations with platelet count appeared sex dependent.

CONCLUSIONS:

Significant associations of common blood platelet measurements are observed with sex and cardiovascular risk factors, namely smoking and lipids. Research is warranted to confirm these relationships in other cohorts, evaluate differences by ethnicity, and examine longitudinal effects on disease risk.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular diseases; Cholesterol; Platelet count; Platelet volume; Platelets; Smoking

PMID:
25771288
PMCID:
PMC4457710
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.01.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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