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Trends Immunol. 2015 Apr;36(4):240-9. doi: 10.1016/j.it.2015.02.005. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

Intertwined regulation of angiogenesis and immunity by myeloid cells.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Center, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Electronic address: lee.rivera@ucsf.edu.
2
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Center, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; Brain Tumor Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Electronic address: gabriele.bergers@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer because its induction is indispensable to fuel an expanding tumor. The tumor microenvironment contributes to tumor vessel growth, and distinct myeloid cells recruited by the tumor have been shown not only to support angiogenesis but also to foster an immune suppressive environment that supports tumor expansion and progression. Recent findings suggest that the intertwined regulation of angiogenesis and immune modulation can offer therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of cancer. We review the mechanisms by which distinct myeloid cell populations contribute to tumor angiogenesis, discuss current approaches in the clinic that are targeting both angiogenic and immune suppressive pathways, and highlight important areas of future research.

PMID:
25770923
PMCID:
PMC4393787
DOI:
10.1016/j.it.2015.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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