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Aust Fam Physician. 2015 Mar;44(3):102-5.

Ingrown toenails: the role of the GP.

Author information

1
BSc (Pod), MSc, PhD, Professor and Head, Podiatric Medicine Unit, School of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An ingrown toenail or onychocryptosis may occur at any age and is the mostly commonly encountered toenail problem likely to be seen in general practice.

OBJECTIVE:

This article will discuss the common surgical approaches available for the management of an ingrown toenail.

DISCUSSION:

Ingrown toenail can be a painful condition that can become infected and may require surgical treatment. The epidemiology of onychocryptosis is difficult to determine as it is often considered to be a minor medical problem and as such has been some-what neglected in the literature. The few studies that have been conducted suggest a slightly higher male-to-female ratio, particularly in the 14-25 age group,4 but it can affect patients of any age. There are multiple reasons why an ingrown toenail will develop, including improper nail cutting technique, tight-fitting footwear, trauma, anatomical factors such as thickening of the nail plate, pincer-shaped toenail, pressure from abutting digits caused by hallux valgus or lesser toe deformities, the presence of a subungual exostosis and, occasionally, the use of isotretinoin in the treatment of severe acne.

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PMID:
25770573
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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