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Child Abuse Negl. 2015 Jul;45:154-62. doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.02.007. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

Associations between body mass index, post-traumatic stress disorder, and child maltreatment in young women.

Author information

1
George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA; Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
2
Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.
4
Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
5
E. Kenneth Hatton Institute for Research and Education, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
6
Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; School of Education, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine interrelationships between child maltreatment, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and body mass index (BMI) in young women. We used multinomial logistic regression models to explore the possibility that PTSD statistically mediates or moderates the association between BMI category and self-reported childhood sexual abuse (CSA), physical abuse (CPA), or neglect among 3,699 young women participating in a population-based twin study. Obese women had the highest prevalence of CSA, CPA, neglect, and PTSD (p<.001 for all). Although all three forms of child maltreatment were significantly, positively associated with overweight and obesity in unadjusted models, only CSA was significantly associated with obesity after adjusting for other forms of maltreatment and covariates (OR=2.21, 95% CI: 1.63, 3.00). CSA and neglect, but not CPA, were associated with underweight in unadjusted models; however, after adjusting for other forms of maltreatment and covariates, the associations were no longer statistically significant (OR=1.43, 95% CI: 0.90-2.28 and OR=2.16, 95% CI: 0.90-5.16 for CSA and neglect, respectively). Further adjustment for PTSD generally resulted in modest attenuation of effects across associations of child maltreatment forms with BMI categories, suggesting that PTSD may, at most, be only a weak partial mediator of these associations. Future longitudinal studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms linking CSA and obesity and to further evaluate the role of PTSD in associations between child maltreatment and obesity.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; Child maltreatment; Obesity; PTSD

PMID:
25770346
PMCID:
PMC4470860
DOI:
10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.02.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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