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J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2015 Jul-Aug;3(4):521-9.e10. doi: 10.1016/j.jaip.2015.02.001. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

Molecular Diagnosis of Shrimp Allergy: Efficiency of Several Allergens to Predict Clinical Reactivity.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy & Immunology and the Jaffe Food Allergy Research Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Servei d'Immunologia, Centre de Diagnòstic Biomèdic (CDB), Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain.
2
Division of Allergy & Immunology and the Jaffe Food Allergy Research Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.
3
Division of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, University of Saõ Paulo School of Medicine, Saõ Paulo, Brazil.
4
Allergy Department, Hospital Infantil Universitario del Niño Jesús, Madrid, Spain; Section of Allergy, Fundación Jimenez Díaz, Madrid, Spain.
5
Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL), Salsbury Cove, Me.
6
Allergy Department, Hospital Infantil Universitario del Niño Jesús, Madrid, Spain.
7
Section of Allergy, Fundación Jimenez Díaz, Madrid, Spain.
8
Division of Allergy & Immunology and the Jaffe Food Allergy Research Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Ear, Nose and Throat Associates of New York, P.C., NY. Electronic address: rayuso2001@yahoo.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The diagnosis of shellfish allergy remains a challenge for clinicians. Several shellfish allergens have been characterized and their IgE epitopes identified. However, the clinical relevance of this sensitization is still not clear.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to identify allergens and epitopes associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp.

METHODS:

Shrimp-sensitized subjects were recruited and grouped based on the history of shrimp-allergic reactions and challenge outcome. IgE reactivity to recombinant crustacean allergens, and IgE and IgG4 reactivity to peptides were determined. Subjects sensitized to dust mites and/or cockroach without shrimp sensitization or reported allergic reactions, as well as nonatopic individuals, were used as controls.

RESULTS:

A total of 86 subjects were recruited with a skin prick test to shrimp; 74 reported shrimp-allergic reactions, 58 were allergic (38 positive double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge and 20 recent anaphylaxis), and 16 were tolerant. All subjects without a history of reactions had negative challenges. The individuals with a positive challenge more frequently recognized tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins than those found tolerant by the challenge. Especially a sarcoplasmic-calcium-binding-protein positive test is very likely to result in a positive challenge, though the frequency of recognition is low. Subjects with dust mite and/or cockroach allergy not sensitized to shrimp recognized arginine kinase and hemocyanin. Several epitopes of these allergens may be important in predicting clinical reactivity.

CONCLUSION:

Tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic-calcium-binding-protein sensitization is associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp. Myosin light chain testing may help in the diagnosis of clinical reactivity. Arginine kinase and hemocyanin appear to be cross-reacting allergens between shrimp and arthropods. Detection of IgE to these allergens and some of their epitopes may be better diagnostic tools in the routine workup of shrimp allergy.

KEYWORDS:

Arginine kinase; Component-resolved diagnosis; DBPCFC; Epitope; Fatty-acid-binding protein; Hemocyanin; Microarray; Myosin light chain; Sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein; Shellfish allergy; Tropomyosin; Troponin C

Comment in

PMID:
25769902
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaip.2015.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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