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J Epidemiol Community Health. 2015 Aug;69(8):732-7. doi: 10.1136/jech-2014-204989. Epub 2015 Mar 12.

Association of a lifestyle index with MRI-determined liver fat content in a general population study.

Author information

1
Institute of Epidemiology, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany Institute of Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
2
Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
3
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany Nutritional Epidemiology, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-University Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
4
Clinic for Diagnostic Radiology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
5
PopGen Biobank, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
6
Institute of Epidemiology, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
7
Institute of Internal Medicine I, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
8
Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
9
Institute of Nutritional Medicine, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In prior studies, lifestyle indices were associated with numerous disease end points, but the association with fatty liver disease (FLD), a key correlate of cardiometabolic risk, is unknown. The aim was to investigate associations between a lifestyle index with liver fat content.

METHODS:

Liver fat was quantified by MRI as liver signal intensity (LSI) in 354 individuals selected from a population-based cohort from Germany. Exposure to favourable lifestyle factors was quantified using an additive score with each factor modelled as a dichotomous trait. Favourable lifestyle factors were defined as waist circumference below 102 (men) or 88 cm (women), physical activity ≥3.5 h/week, never-smoking and a favourable dietary pattern, which was derived to explain liver fat variation. In a cross-sectional study, multivariable adjusted linear and logistic regression was applied to investigate the association between the lifestyle index (range 0-4, exposure) and LSI (modelled as a continuous trait or dichotomised as a FLD indicator variable, respectively).

RESULTS:

Individuals with four favourable lifestyle factors (n=9%) had lower LSI values (ß -0.40; 95% CI -0.61 to -0.19) and a lower OR (0.09; 95% CI 0.03 to 0.30) for FLD compared with individuals with zero favourable lifestyle factors (n=10%).

CONCLUSIONS:

A healthy lifestyle pattern was associated with less liver fat. Prospective studies are warranted.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology of chronic non communicable diseases; LIFESTYLE; NUTRITION; OBESITY; PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

PMID:
25767131
DOI:
10.1136/jech-2014-204989
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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