Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2015 May 15;118(10):1181-90. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.01070.2014. Epub 2015 Mar 12.

[18F]-FDG positron emission tomography--an established clinical tool opening a new window into exercise physiology.

Author information

1
Integrative Neurophysiology Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; and thorsten.rudroff@colostate.edu.
2
Integrative Neurophysiology Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; and.
3
Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

Abstract

Positron emission tomography (PET) with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is an established clinical tool primarily used to diagnose and evaluate disease status in patients with cancer. PET imaging using FDG can be a highly valuable tool to investigate normal human physiology by providing a noninvasive, quantitative measure of glucose uptake into various cell types. Over the past years it has also been increasingly used in exercise physiology studies to identify changes in glucose uptake, metabolism, and muscle activity during different exercise modalities. Metabolically active cells transport FDG, an (18)fluorine-labeled glucose analog tracer, from the blood into the cells where it is then phosphorylated but not further metabolized. This metabolic trapping process forms the basis of this method's use during exercise. The tracer is given to a participant during an exercise task, and the actual PET imaging is performed immediately after the exercise. Provided the uptake period is of sufficient duration, and the imaging is performed shortly after the exercise; the captured image strongly reflects the metabolic activity of the cells used during the task. When combined with repeated blood sampling to determine tracer blood concentration over time, also known as the input function, glucose uptake rate of the tissues can be quantitatively calculated. This synthesis provides an accounting of studies using FDG-PET to measure acute exercise-induced skeletal muscle activity, describes the advantages and limitations of this imaging technique, and discusses its applications to the field of exercise physiology.

KEYWORDS:

exercise; glucose uptake; noninvasive imaging; skeletal muscle; tracer

PMID:
25767034
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.01070.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center