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Environ Pollut. 2015 Jun;201:34-41. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.02.023. Epub 2015 Mar 9.

Chronic drought stress reduced but not protected Shantung maple (Acer truncatum Bunge) from adverse effects of ozone (O3) on growth and physiology in the suburb of Beijing, China.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
2
Stockbridge School, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA.
3
Hazardous Air Pollutants Lab, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021, China; Ningbo Urban Environment Observation and Research Station-NUEORS, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315830, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China. Electronic address: Wangxk@rcees.ac.cn.

Abstract

A two-year experiment exposing Acer truncatum Bunge seedlings to elevated ozone (O3) concentrations above ambient air (AO) and drought stress (DS) was carried out using open-top chambers (OTCs) in a suburb of Beijing in north China in 2012-2013. The results suggested that AO and DS had both significantly reduced leaf mass area (LMA), stomatal conductance (Gs), light saturated photosynthetic rate (Asat) as well as above and below ground biomass at the end of the experiment. It appeared that while drought stress mitigated the expression of foliar injury, LMA, leaf photosynthetic pigments, height growth and basal diameter, due to limited carbon fixation, the O3 - induced reductions in Asat, Gs and total biomass were enhanced 23.7%. 15.5% and 8.1% respectively. These data suggest that when the whole plant was considered that drought under the conditions of this experiment did not protect the Shantung maple seedlings from the effects of O3.

KEYWORDS:

Biomass; Drought stress; Ozone effect; Photosynthesis; Shantung maple (Acer truncatum Bunge)

PMID:
25765971
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2015.02.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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