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Ann Occup Environ Med. 2014 Dec 21;26:53. doi: 10.1186/s40557-014-0053-9. eCollection 2014.

The association between long working hours and the metabolic syndrome: evidences from the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 2010 and 2012.

Author information

1
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Yeungnam University Hospital, 170, Hyeonchung-ro, Nam-gu, Daegu, 705-802 Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Yeungnam University Hospital, 170, Hyeonchung-ro, Nam-gu, Daegu, 705-802 Republic of Korea ; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, 170, Hyeonchung-ro, Nam-gu, Daegu, 705-802 Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study was conducted in order to evaluate the association between the working hours of Korean employees and the metabolic syndrome and the effects of long working hours on metabolic syndrome based on the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012).

METHODS:

Based on the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012), 4,456 Korean employees without shift work, aged over 15, who work 30 hours or more per week were targeted in this study. The association between the general characteristics, including age, smoking, alcohol drinking, exercise, and the metabolic syndrome criteria defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and weekly working hours were analyzed. In addition, the association between weekly working hours and the metabolic syndrome of the subjects stratified by gender was analyzed through multiple logistic regression analyses and generalized linear mixed model after adjusting the general characteristics.

RESULTS:

In the results of stratified analysis by gender, in male subjects, in comparison with the 30-39 weekly working hours group, there were no significant adjusted odds ratios to the other working hours groups. In female subjects, in comparison with the 30-39 weekly working hours group, there were no significant adjusted odds ratios to the other working hours groups. In addition, no trend associations were observed among weekly working hour groups in both stratified genders.

CONCLUSION:

No significant differences in prevalence of metabolic syndrome of the subjects stratified by gender were found according to weekly increasing working hours. However, due to some limitations of this study, further prospective studies may be necessary for verification.

KEYWORDS:

Central obesity; Long working hours; Metabolic syndrome

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