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J Clin Microbiol. 2015 May;53(5):1648-54. doi: 10.1128/JCM.03436-14. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

Subtyping novel zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
2
Public Health Laboratory, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.
3
Vermont Department of Health Laboratory, Burlington, Vermont, USA.
4
New York City Department of Environmental Protection, Valhalla, New York, USA.
5
Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
6
Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, USA.
7
Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
8
Division of Global HIV/AIDS, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
9
State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China yyfeng@ecust.edu.cn lxiao@cdc.gov.
10
Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA yyfeng@ecust.edu.cn lxiao@cdc.gov.

Abstract

Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I is an emerging zoonotic pathogen in humans. The lack of subtyping tools makes it impossible to determine the role of zoonotic transmission in epidemiology. To identify potential subtyping markers, we sequenced the genome of a human chipmunk genotype I isolate. Altogether, 9,509,783 bp of assembled sequences in 853 contigs were obtained, with an N50 of 117,886 bp and >200-fold coverage. Based on the whole-genome sequence data, two genetic markers encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) and a mucin protein (ortholog of cgd1_470) were selected for the development of a subtyping tool. The tool was used for characterizing chipmunk genotype I in 25 human specimens from four U.S. states and Sweden, one specimen each from an eastern gray squirrel, a chipmunk, and a deer mouse, and 4 water samples from New York. At the gp60 locus, although different subtypes were seen among the animals, water, and humans, the 15 subtypes identified differed mostly in the numbers of trinucleotide repeats (TCA, TCG, or TCT) in the serine repeat region, with only two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the nonrepeat region. Some geographic differences were found in the subtype distribution of chipmunk genotype I from humans. In contrast, only two subtypes were found at the mucin locus, which differed from each other in the numbers of a 30-bp minisatellite repeat. Thus, Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I isolates from humans and wildlife are genetically similar, and zoonotic transmission might play a potential role in human infections.

PMID:
25762767
PMCID:
PMC4400750
DOI:
10.1128/JCM.03436-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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