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Scand J Occup Ther. 2015 Jul;22(4):277-82. doi: 10.3109/11038128.2015.1020865. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

Expanding client-centred thinking to include social determinants: a practical scenario based on the occupation of breastfeeding.

Author information

1
University of Washington, Rehabilitation Medicine , 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 356490, Seattle, WA 98195-6490 , USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Client-centred thinking in occupational therapy underemphasizes the influence of social determinants and societal-level factors on occupation across the life course. When client-centred thinking focuses solely on the local or immediate contexts of individuals, therapists may not fully recognize or understand how social determinants can create barriers to occupational participation and performance.

AIM/OBJECTIVES:

This article critically examines gaps in traditional thinking concerning client-centredness and demonstrates how the complex interplay between social determinants and societal-level factors may lead to occupational injustices.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A practical example from a recent study on breastfeeding and accompanying scenario is used to examine limitations in current client-centred reasoning. The Life Course Health Development framework, a theoretical framework examining contexts of health disparities, is applied to illustrate the opportunity to expand thinking about client-centredness.

RESULTS:

The Life Course Health Development framework may be a useful addition to client-centred thinking about social determinants of occupation.

CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE:

Expanding client-centred thinking to include awareness, understanding, and respect for social determinants of occupation may enhance therapist-client interactions and outcomes of the occupational therapy process, and address gaps in current thinking that may contribute to occupational injustices.

KEYWORDS:

critical thinking; occupational justice; social determinants; theoretical development

PMID:
25761677
PMCID:
PMC6781861
DOI:
10.3109/11038128.2015.1020865
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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