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Nat Commun. 2015 Mar 11;6:6528. doi: 10.1038/ncomms7528.

Gut microbiome development along the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence.

Author information

1
1] BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China [2] Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
2
1] BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China [2] School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China.
3
BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Oberndorf, Teaching Hospital of the Paracelsus Private University of Salzburg, Paracelsusstrasse 37, 5110 Oberndorf, Austria.
5
1] BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China [2] School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China [3] BGI Hong Kong Research Institute, Hong Kong, China.
6
1] BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China [2] Princess Al Jawhara Center of Excellence in the Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.
7
1] BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China [2] The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
8
First Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
9
1] BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China [2] Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark [3] Princess Al Jawhara Center of Excellence in the Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia [4] Macau University of Science and Technology, Avenida Wai long, Taipa, Macau 999078, China.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer, a commonly diagnosed cancer in the elderly, often develops slowly from benign polyps called adenoma. The gut microbiota is believed to be directly involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. The identity and functional capacity of the adenoma- or carcinoma-related gut microbe(s), however, have not been surveyed in a comprehensive manner. Here we perform a metagenome-wide association study (MGWAS) on stools from advanced adenoma and carcinoma patients and from healthy subjects, revealing microbial genes, strains and functions enriched in each group. An analysis of potential risk factors indicates that high intake of red meat relative to fruits and vegetables appears to associate with outgrowth of bacteria that might contribute to a more hostile gut environment. These findings suggest that faecal microbiome-based strategies may be useful for early diagnosis and treatment of colorectal adenoma or carcinoma.

PMID:
25758642
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms7528
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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