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PLoS One. 2015 Mar 10;10(3):e0119965. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0119965. eCollection 2015.

Alcohol use among adolescent youth: the role of friendship networks and family factors in multiple school studies.

Author information

1
Department of Sociology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America.
2
Departments of Criminology, Law and Society and Sociology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America.
3
Departments of Sociology and Statistics, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America.
4
Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America.
5
Program in Public Health, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America.

Abstract

To explore the co-evolution of friendship tie choice and alcohol use behavior among 1,284 adolescents from 12 small schools and 976 adolescents from one big school sampled in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (AddHealth), we apply a Stochastic Actor-Based (SAB) approach implemented in the R-based Simulation Investigation for Empirical Network Analysis (RSiena) package. Our results indicate the salience of both peer selection and peer influence effects for friendship tie choice and adolescent drinking behavior. Concurrently, the main effect models indicate that parental monitoring and the parental home drinking environment affected adolescent alcohol use in the small school sample, and that parental home drinking environment affected adolescent drinking in the large school sample. In the small school sample, we detect an interaction between the parental home drinking environment and choosing friends that drink as they multiplicatively affect friendship tie choice. Our findings suggest that future research should investigate the synergistic effects of both peer and parental influences for adolescent friendship tie choices and drinking behavior. And given the tendency of adolescents to form ties with their friends' friends, and the evidence of local hierarchy in these networks, popular youth who do not drink may be uniquely positioned and uniquely salient as the highest rank of the hierarchy to cause anti-drinking peer influences to diffuse down the social hierarchy to less popular youth. As such, future interventions should harness prosocial peer influences simultaneously with strategies to increase parental support and monitoring among parents to promote affiliation with prosocial peers.

PMID:
25756364
PMCID:
PMC4355410
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0119965
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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