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J Infect Dis. 2015 Sep 15;212(6):904-8. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiv136. Epub 2015 Mar 9.

HIV-1 Superinfection Resembles Primary Infection.

Author information

1
Division of Medical Virology, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa.
2
Division of Medical Virology, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Kigali, Rwanda.
3
Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) Department of Infectious Diseases, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban.
4
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cape Town.
5
Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York.
6
Division of Medical Virology, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Abstract

The relevance of superinfection as a model to identify correlates of protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) depends on whether the superinfecting transmission resembles primary infection, which has not been established. Here, we characterize the genetic bottleneck in superinfected individuals for the first time. In all 3 cases, superinfection produced a spike in viral load and could be traced to a single, C-C chemokine receptor 5-tropic founder virus with shorter, less glycosylated variable regions than matched chronic viruses. These features are consistent with primary HIV transmission and provide support for the use of superinfection as a model to address correlates of protection against HIV.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; T/F; correlates of protection; founder; superinfection; transmitted

PMID:
25754982
PMCID:
PMC4548460
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiv136
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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