Format

Send to

Choose Destination
World J Pediatr. 2016 Feb;12(1):109-13. doi: 10.1007/s12519-015-0010-x. Epub 2015 Mar 9.

Intravenous iron sucrose for children with iron deficiency anemia: a single institution study.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Democritus University of Thrace Faculty of Medicine, University General Hospital of Evros, Alexandroupolis, Thrace, Greece. emantada@med.duth.gr.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Democritus University of Thrace Faculty of Medicine, University General Hospital of Evros, Alexandroupolis, Thrace, Greece.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intravenous iron sucrose is not recommended by its manufacturers for use in children despite extensive safety and efficacy data in adults.

METHODS:

We reviewed the experience of our department between January, 2011 and February, 2014 with the use of intravenous iron sucrose in children ≤14 years of age who failed in oral iron therapy for iron deficiency anemia (IDA).

RESULTS:

Twelve children (6 females) aged 1.2-14 years (median age 8.9 years) received at least one dose of intravenous iron sucrose. Ten patients had IDA inadequately treated or non-responsive to oral iron therapy. One patient received therapy for blood transfusion avoidance and one for presumed iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). Iron sucrose infusions were given on alternate days up to three times per week. The number of infusions per patient ranged from 2 to 6 (median, 3), the individual doses from 100 mg to 200 mg (median, 200 mg), and the total doses from 200 mg to 1200 mg (median, 400 mg). Iron sucrose was effective in raising the hemoglobin concentration to normal in all patients with IDA, i.e., from 7.6±2.38 g/dL to 12.4±0.64 g/dL, within 31-42 days after the first infusion. The single patient with IRIDA demonstrated a 1.8 g/dL rise. Injection site disorders in three cases and transient taste perversion in one case were the only side effects.

CONCLUSION:

Intravenous iron sucrose appears to be safe and very effective in children with IDA who do not respond or cannot tolerate oral iron therapy.

KEYWORDS:

adverse effects; iron deficiency; iron sucrose; parenteral iron

Comment in

PMID:
25754747
DOI:
10.1007/s12519-015-0010-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center