Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015 Mar-Apr;47(2):120-6.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2014.11.005.

Patterns of energy drink advertising over US television networks.

Author information

1
Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH; Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH. Electronic address: Jennifer.A.Emond@dartmouth.edu.
2
Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH; Department of Pediatrics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH.
3
Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH; Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe programming themes and the inclusion of adolescents in the base audience for television channels with high levels of energy drink advertising airtime.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of energy drink advertising airtime over US network and cable television channels (n = 139) from March, 2012 to February, 2013. Programming themes and the inclusion of adolescents in each channel's base audience were extracted from cable television trade reports.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Energy drink advertising airtime.

ANALYSIS:

Channels were ranked by airtime; programming themes and the inclusion of adolescents in the base audience were summarized for the 10 channels with the most airtime.

RESULTS:

Over the study year, 36,501 minutes (608 hours) were devoted to energy drink advertisements; the top 10 channels accounted for 46.5% of such airtime. Programming themes for the top 10 channels were music (n = 3), sports (n = 3), action-adventure lifestyle (n = 2), African American lifestyle (n = 1), and comedy (n = 1). MTV2 ranked first in airtime devoted to energy drink advertisements. Six of the 10 channels with the most airtime included adolescents aged 12-17 years in their base audience.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Energy drink manufacturers primarily advertise on channels that likely appeal to adolescents. Nutritionists may wish to consider energy drink media literacy when advising adolescents about energy drink consumption.

KEYWORDS:

adolescents; energy drinks; marketing; television

PMID:
25754297
PMCID:
PMC4356017
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneb.2014.11.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center