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Trends Immunol. 2015 Mar;36(3):121-3. doi: 10.1016/j.it.2015.01.001.

Our interface with the built environment: immunity and the indoor microbiota.

Author information

1
Institute for Genomic and Systems Biology, Biosciences Department, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, 1101 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
2
Committee on Immunology, Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, 924 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
3
Institute for Genomic and Systems Biology, Biosciences Department, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, 1101 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA; Marine Biological Laboratory, 7 MBL Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA; College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, China. Electronic address: gilbertjack@anl.gov.

Abstract

The rise of urbanization and an increasingly indoor lifestyle has affected human interactions with our microbiota in unprecedented ways. We discuss how this lifestyle may influence immune development and function, and argue that it is time that we examined ways to manipulate the indoor environment to increase our exposure to a wider phylogeny of microorganisms. An important step is to continue to engage citizen scientists in the efforts to characterize our interactions with the diverse microbial environments that we inhabit.

KEYWORDS:

built environment; microbiome

PMID:
25754179
PMCID:
PMC4666509
DOI:
10.1016/j.it.2015.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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