Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Virology. 2015 May;479-480:52-65. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2015.02.033. Epub 2015 Mar 7.

Ubiquitination in the antiviral immune response.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, United States. Electronic address: michaela_gack@hms.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Ubiquitination has long been known to regulate fundamental cellular processes through the induction of proteasomal degradation of target proteins. More recently, 'atypical' non-degradative types of polyubiquitin chains have been appreciated as important regulatory moieties by modulating the activity or subcellular localization of key signaling proteins. Intriguingly, many of these non-degradative types of ubiquitination regulate the innate sensing pathways initiated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), ultimately coordinating an effective antiviral immune response. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the functional roles of degradative and atypical types of ubiquitination in innate immunity to viral infections, with a specific focus on the signaling pathways triggered by RIG-I-like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and the intracellular viral DNA sensor cGAS.

KEYWORDS:

Antiviral immunity; E3 ligases; RIG-I-like receptors; STING; TRIM proteins; TRIM25; Toll-like receptors; Type-I interferon; Ubiquitin; cGAS

PMID:
25753787
PMCID:
PMC4774549
DOI:
10.1016/j.virol.2015.02.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center