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Nat Med. 2015 Apr;21(4):314-7. doi: 10.1038/nm.3812. Epub 2015 Mar 9.

RIFINs are adhesins implicated in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

Author information

1
Center for Infectious Disease Research, Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Center for Biomembrane Research, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
SciLifeLab, Departments of Oncology, Pathology, Molecular Medicine, and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Fredriksberg, Denmark.
5
Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Department of Biosciences, Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
7
Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

Abstract

Rosetting is a virulent Plasmodium falciparum phenomenon associated with severe malaria. Here we demonstrate that P. falciparum-encoded repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) are expressed on the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBCs), where they bind to RBCs--preferentially of blood group A--to form large rosettes and mediate microvascular binding of iRBCs. We suggest that RIFINs have a fundamental role in the development of severe malaria and thereby contribute to the varying global distribution of ABO blood groups in the human population.

PMID:
25751816
DOI:
10.1038/nm.3812
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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