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Health Psychol Behav Med. 2014 Jan 1;2(1):496-508. Epub 2014 Apr 28.

Physical function and quality of well-being in fibromyalgia: the applicability of the goodness-of-fit hypothesis.

Author information

1
San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology , 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego , CA , USA , 92120.
2
Department of Psychology, San Diego State University , San Diego , CA , USA.
3
San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology , 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego , CA , USA , 92120 ; Department of Psychology, San Diego State University , San Diego , CA , USA.
4
Kaiser Permanente of Southern California , San Diego , CA , USA.

Abstract

Objective: The goodness-of-fit hypothesis suggests that the effectiveness of a coping strategy depends on the match between type of strategy (problem-focused, emotion-focused) and the level of perceived control. This hypothesis was examined as a predictor of physical functioning and quality of well-being (QWB) in a large sample of women with fibromyalgia. Methods: Participants were 478 women with diagnosed fibromyalgia (Mage = 54.31, SD = 11.2), who were part of a larger intervention in which no intervention effects were found. Hierarchical, mixed selection regressions were performed to determine whether the relationship between coping and control-predicted physical functioning and QWB. Results: Participants who reported having lower levels of perceived control over their fibromyalgia syndrome and who engaged in more self-controlling coping (emotion-focused strategy) experienced greater QWB and physical functioning than those who used less self-controlling coping. Various main effects for coping and perceived control were also found. Level of physical functioning was also related to escape-avoidance, distancing, and perceived control. The level of QWB was related to social-support seeking, accepting responsibility, distancing, problem-solving, and perceived control. Conclusions: This study provides a greater understanding of the relationships among coping, perceived control, physical functioning, and well-being for women with fibromyalgia. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

control; coping; fibromyalgia syndrome; physical function; quality of well-being

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