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Metabolism. 2015 Jun;64(6):756-64. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2015.01.013. Epub 2015 Jan 29.

Adipokine levels during the first or early second trimester of pregnancy and subsequent risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: A systematic review.

Author information

1
Epidemiology Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD.
2
Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN.
4
Departments of Epidemiology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI.
5
Epidemiology Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD. Electronic address: zhangcu@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to systematically review available literature linking adipokines to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) for a comprehensive understanding of the roles of adipokines in the development of GDM.

METHODS:

We searched PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for published studies on adipokines and GDM through October 21, 2014. We included articles if they had a prospective study design (i.e., blood samples for adipokines measurement were collected before GDM diagnosis). Random-effects models were used to pool the weighted mean differences comparing levels of adipokines between GDM cases and non-GDM controls.

RESULTS:

Of 1523 potentially relevant articles, we included 25 prospective studies relating adipokines to incident GDM. Our meta-analysis of nine prospective studies on adiponectin and eight prospective studies on leptin indicated that adiponectin levels in the first or early second trimester of pregnancy were 2.25 μg/ml lower (95% CI: 1.75-2.75), whereas leptin levels were 7.25 ng/ml higher (95% CI 3.27-11.22), among women who later developed GDM than women who did not. Prospective data were sparse and findings were inconsistent for visfatin, retinol binding protein (RBP-4), resistin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and vaspin. We did not identify prospective studies for several novel adipokines, including chemerin, apelin, omentin, or adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein. Moreover, no published prospective studies with longitudinal assessment of adipokines and incident GDM were identified.

CONCLUSION:

Adiponectin levels in the first or second trimester of pregnancy are lower among pregnant women who later develop GDM than non-GDM women, whereas leptin levels are higher. Well-designed prospective studies with longitudinal assessment of adipokines during pregnancy are needed to understand the trajectories and dynamic associations of adipokines with GDM risk.

KEYWORDS:

Adipokines; Adiponectin; Gestational diabetes mellitus; Leptin

PMID:
25749468
PMCID:
PMC4625979
DOI:
10.1016/j.metabol.2015.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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