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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2015 Sep 15;119(6):726-33. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00904.2014. Epub 2015 Mar 6.

Clinical outcomes and cardiovascular responses to exercise training in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia.
2
School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia nsmart2@une.edu.au.

Abstract

Exercise training induces physical adaptations for heart failure patients with systolic dysfunction, but less is known about those patients with preserved ejection fraction. To establish whether exercise training produces changes in peak V̇o2 and related measures, quality of life, general health, and diastolic function in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction. We conducted a MEDLINE search (1985 to October 10, 2014), for exercise-based rehabilitation trials in heart failure, using search terms "exercise training, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, heart failure with normal ejection fraction, peak V̇o₂, and diastolic heart dysfunction". Seven intervention studies were included providing a total of 144 exercising subjects and 114 control subjects, a total of 258 participants. Peak V̇o₂ increased by a mean difference (MD) 2.13 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.54 to 2.71, P < 0.00001] in exercise training vs. sedentary control, equating to a 17% improvement from baseline. The corresponding data are provided for the following exercise test variables: V̇e/V̇co₂ slope, MD 0.85 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (95% CI 0.05 to 1.65, P = 0.04); maximum heart rate, MD 5.60 beats per minute (95% CI 3.95 to 7.25, P < 0.00001); Six-Minute Walk Test, MD 32.1 m (95% CI 17.2 to 47.1, P < 0.0001); and indices of diastolic function: E/A ratio, MD 0.07 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.12, P = 0.005); E/E' ratio MD -2.31 (95% CI -3.44 to -1.19, P < 0.0001); deceleration time (DT), MD -13.2 ms (95% CI -19.8 to -6.5, P = 0.0001); and quality of life: Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, MD -6.50 (95% CI -9.47 to -3.53, P < 0.0001); and short form-36 health survey (physical dimension), MD 15.6 (95% CI 7.4 to 23.8, P = 0.0002). In 3,744 h patient-hours of training, not one death was directly attributable to exercise. Exercise training appears to effect several health-related improvements in people with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

KEYWORDS:

cardio-respiratory fitness; exercise training; heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

PMID:
25749444
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.00904.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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