Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2016;29(4):596-601. doi: 10.3109/14767058.2015.1012062. Epub 2015 Mar 9.

Does the antenatal detection of fetal growth restriction (FGR) have a prognostic value for mortality and short-term morbidity for very preterm infants? Results from the MOSAIC cohort.

Author information

1
a INSERM, Obstetrical, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology Research Team, Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics (U1153), Paris-Descartes University , Paris , France .
2
b Service de Médecine et Réanimation néonatales de Port-Royal, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Centre Site Cochin, Université Paris V René Descartes and Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris , Paris , France .
3
c Department of Neonatology , Antwerp University Hospital, University of Antwerp and Study Centre for Perinatal Epidemiology Flanders , Belgium , and.
4
d Research Unit of Perinatal Epidemiology , Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Viale Ferdinando Baldelli 41 , Roma , Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the impact of antenatal diagnosis of fetal growth restriction (FGR) on the risks of mortality and morbidity for very preterm infants given actual birthweight percentiles.

METHODS:

Data on 4608 live born infants 24-31 weeks of gestational age (GA) in 10 European regions in 2003 were used to compare in-hospital mortality, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and severe neurological morbidity by birthweight percentiles and antenatal diagnosis of FGR. Other covariates were GA, sex, multiplicity, maternal complications, antenatal corticosteroids, birth in a level III center and region.

RESULTS:

Sixteen percent (n = 728) of all infants and 72%, 30% and 6%, respectively, of those with birthweight percentiles <10th, 10th-24th and ≥25th had an antenatal diagnosis of FGR. After adjustment for clinical factors, antenatal diagnosis of FGR was not associated with mortality for infants with a birthweight ≥10th percentile (OR [95% CI]: 0.9 [0.5-1.9] and 1.0 [0.6-1.8] for birthweights between the 10th-24th percentile and ≥25th percentile, respectively), but infants with a birthweight <10th percentile had higher mortality (OR [95% CI]: 2.4 [1.0-5.8]). No association was observed at any birthweight percentile with BPD or severe neurological morbidity.

CONCLUSION:

Antenatal diagnosis of FGR did not influence risks of mortality or morbidity when birthweight was ≥10th percentile; however, mortality risk was higher in antenatally detected infants with birthweight below the <10th percentile.

KEYWORDS:

Birthweight percentile; bronchopulmonary dysplasia; fetal growth restriction; in-hospital mortality; preterm infants; severe neurological morbidity

PMID:
25747950
DOI:
10.3109/14767058.2015.1012062
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center