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Ultrasound Med Biol. 2015 Jun;41(6):1779-83. doi: 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2015.01.013. Epub 2015 Mar 4.

A pilot study to assess Fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus in patients with rotator cuff tears: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Laboratory, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu, Japan. Electronic address: tsuneo_w@gifu-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.
3
Department of Regeneration and Advanced Medical Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.
4
Division of Clinical Laboratory, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu, Japan.
5
Department of Sports Medicine and Sports Science, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the echo intensity of the supraspinatus muscle and compare magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound findings for 27 patients (12 women, 15 men, 65.8 ± 11.5 y). Tear size and fatty infiltration were determined by magnetic resonance imaging; five stages were assigned based on Goutallier's classification. Gray-scale histogram analysis was used for ultrasound assessment, which was performed in both subcutaneous fat and supraspinatus muscle in three different regions; the echo intensity ratio was the ratio of echo intensity in subcutaneous fat to that in the supraspinatus muscle. Sonograms of 27 shoulders revealed 3 shoulders with a partial tear, and 4 with a small tear, 6 with a medium tear, 6 with a large tear and 4 with a massive tear; 4 shoulders had no tear. Supraspinatus muscle echo intensity and echo intensity ratio were significantly lower in the stage 0 and 1 than in stages 2-4. Our study suggests that ultrasound can quantitatively and objectively assess fatty infiltration in the rotator cuff muscle.

KEYWORDS:

Fatty infiltration; Histogram analysis; Rotator cuff; Ultrasound

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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