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Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl. 2015 May;50:173-8. doi: 10.1016/j.msec.2015.02.010. Epub 2015 Feb 11.

Autonomous patterning of cells on microstructured fine particles.

Author information

1
Graduate School of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065, Japan. Electronic address: takeda-iwori@ed.tmu.ac.jp.
2
Graduate School of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065, Japan. Electronic address: kawanabe-masato@ed.tmu.ac.jp.
3
Graduate School of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065, Japan. Electronic address: kaneko-arata@tmu.ac.jp.

Abstract

Regularly patterned cells can clarify cellular function and are required in some biochip applications. This study examines cell patterning along microstructures and the effect of microstructural geometry on selective cellular adhesion. Particles can be autonomously assembled on a soda-lime glass substrate that is chemically patterned by immersion in a suspension of fine particles. By adopting various sizes of fine particles, we can control the geometry of the microstructure. Cells adhere more readily to microstructured fine particles than to flat glass substrate. Silica particles hexagonally packed in 5-40 μm line and space microstructures provide an effective cell scaffold on the glass substrate. Cultured cells tend to attach and proliferate along the microstructured region while avoiding the flat region. The difference in cell adhesion is attributed to their geometries, as both of the silica particles and soda-lime glass are hydrophilic related with cell adhesiveness. After cell seeding, cells adhered to the flat region migrated toward the microstructured region. For most of the cells to assemble on the scaffold, the scaffolding microstructures must be spaced by at most 65 μm.

KEYWORDS:

Cell adhesion; Cell culture; Microsphere; Microstructure

PMID:
25746259
DOI:
10.1016/j.msec.2015.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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