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Nat Commun. 2015 Mar 6;6:6400. doi: 10.1038/ncomms7400.

Phonon hydrodynamics in two-dimensional materials.

Author information

1
1] Theory and Simulations of Materials (THEOS), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 12, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland [2] National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 12, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
2
1] Theory and Simulations of Materials (THEOS), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 12, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland [2] Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux, et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC), Sorbonne Universités, UPMC University Paris 06, UMR CNRS 7590, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, IRD UMR 206, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris, France.
3
Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux, et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC), Sorbonne Universités, UPMC University Paris 06, UMR CNRS 7590, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, IRD UMR 206, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris, France.

Abstract

The conduction of heat in two dimensions displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena of key relevance to the scientific understanding and technological applications of graphene and related materials. Here, we use density-functional perturbation theory and an exact, variational solution of the Boltzmann transport equation to study fully from first-principles phonon transport and heat conductivity in graphene, boron nitride, molybdenum disulphide and the functionalized derivatives graphane and fluorographene. In all these materials, and at variance with typical three-dimensional solids, normal processes keep dominating over Umklapp scattering well-above cryogenic conditions, extending to room temperature and more. As a result, novel regimes emerge, with Poiseuille and Ziman hydrodynamics, hitherto typically confined to ultra-low temperatures, characterizing transport at ordinary conditions. Most remarkably, several of these two-dimensional materials admit wave-like heat diffusion, with second sound present at room temperature and above in graphene, boron nitride and graphane.

PMID:
25744932
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms7400

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