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Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2015 Apr;150(2):405-13. doi: 10.1007/s10549-015-3328-0. Epub 2015 Mar 6.

Breast cancer incidence after hormonal treatments for infertility: systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based studies.

Author information

1
S.C. Oncologia Medica, E.O. Ospedali Galliera, Via Volta 6, 16128, Genoa, Italy, alessandra.gennari@galliera.it.

Abstract

The increasing practice of hormonal infertility treatments (HITs) raised concerns about their effects on breast cancer (BC) risk. Available evidence reported conflicting results. The aim of this study was to assess the potential association between HITs and BC risk. The literature was searched through November 2014. Eligible studies included cohort studies reporting BC incidence in women undergone HITs. Data were analyzed with standard meta-analytic techniques. Subgroup analyses were performed by type of intervention (IVF vs. NO IVF), follow-up duration (<10 vs. >10 years), and type of control (population vs. infertile). 20 eligible studies (207.914 women, 2347 BC) were retrieved: no increased risk was detected (SRR = 1.05, 95 % CI 0.96-1.14), with a significant heterogeneity (I (2) = 59 %, p = 0.001) among studies. In the seven studies with the in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure, no increase in BC risk was observed (SRR = 0.96, 95 % CI 0.80-1.14); in the three NO IVF studies, an increased BC risk was identified (SRR = 1.26, 95 %CI 1.06-1.50). A borderline interaction between type of intervention (IVF vs. NO IVF) and BC risk was observed (p = 0.06). An increased risk with longer follow-up (≥10 vs. <10 years) was detected (SRR = 1.13, 95 % CI 1.02-1.26 vs. SRR = 0.95, 95 % CI 0.85-1.06). Overall, HITs are not associated with an increased BC risk. In particular, no increased risk was observed in women undergoing IVF. Conversely, an increased in BC risk cannot be ruled out with older treatment protocols based on clomiphene. The long-term administration of clomiphene outside the current indications should be discouraged because of a possible increase in BC risk.

PMID:
25744295
DOI:
10.1007/s10549-015-3328-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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