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PLoS One. 2015 Mar 5;10(3):e0117552. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0117552. eCollection 2015.

Efficacy of Chinese eye exercises on reducing accommodative lag in school-aged children: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
2
School of public health, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
3
Anyang Eye Hospital, Anyang, Henan Province, China.
4
Chinese Evidence-based Medicine Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdou, China; Clinical Research and Evaluation Unit, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdou, China; Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
5
School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the efficacy of Chinese eye exercises on reducing accommodative lag in children by a randomized, double-blinded controlled trial.

METHODS:

A total of 190 children aged 10 to 14 years with emmetropia to moderate myopia were included. They were randomly allocated to three groups: standard Chinese eye exercises group (trained for eye exercises by doctors of traditional Chinese medicine); sham point eye exercises group (instructed to massage on non-acupoints); and eyes closed group (asked to close their eyes without massage). Primary outcome was change in accommodative lag immediately after intervention. Secondary outcomes included changes in corrected near and distant visual acuity, and visual discomfort score.

RESULTS:

Children in the standard Chinese eye exercises group had significantly greater alleviation of accommodative lag (-0.10 D) than those in sham point eye exercises group (-0.03 D) and eyes closed group (0.07 D) (P = 0.04). The proportion of children with alleviation of accommodative lag was significantly higher in the standard Chinese eye exercises group (54.0%) than in the sham point eye exercises group (32.8%) and the eyes closed group (34.9%) (P = 0.03). No significant differences were found in secondary outcomes.

CONCLUSION:

Chinese eye exercises as performed daily in primary and middle schools in China have statistically but probably clinically insignificant effect in reducing accommodative lag of school-aged children in the short-term. Considering the higher amounts of near work load of Chinese children, the efficacy of eye exercises may be insufficient in preventing myopia progression in the long-term.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01756287.

PMID:
25742161
PMCID:
PMC4350838
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0117552
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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