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PLoS One. 2015 Mar 5;10(3):e0118725. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118725. eCollection 2015.

Comparative genomics of Cluster O mycobacteriophages.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, United States of America.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
3
Department of Biology, Baylor University, Waco, Texas, United States of America.
4
Department of Biology, Gonzaga University, Spokane, Washington, United States of America.
5
Center for Life Sciences Education, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States of America.
6
Biology Department, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, Illinois, United States of America.
7
Department of Microbiology & Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, United States of America.
8
Biology Department, Seton Hill University, Greensburg, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
9
Biology Department, Carthage College, Kenosha, Wisconsin, United States of America.
10
Department of Biology, Cabrini College, Radnor, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
11
Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America.
12
Biology Department, College of Idaho, Caldwell, Idaho, United States of America.
13
School of Sciences, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, Louisiana, United States of America.
14
School of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, Louisiana, United States of America.
15
Department of Biological Sciences & Geology, Queensborough Community College, Bayside, New York, United States of America.
16
Department of Molecular, Cell & Developmental Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, United States of America.
17
Department of Natural Sciences, Del Mar College, Corpus Christi, Texas, United States of America.
18
Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas, United States of America.
19
School of Life Sciences, University of QwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
20
Department of Biology, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky, United States of America.
21
Department of Biology, Saint Joseph's University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
22
Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-River Falls, River Falls, Wisconsin, United States of America.
23
Department of Biology, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
24
Department of Math & Computer Science, Wilkes University, Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
25
Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
26
Department of Molecular & Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine Honors College, Orono, Maine, United States of America.
27
KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis & HIV, Durban, South Africa.
28
Department of Biological Sciences, Ouachita Baptist University, Arkadelphia, Arkansas, United States of America.
29
Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
30
Department of Biology, Hope College, Holland, Michigan, United States of America.
31
Department of Biology, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America.
32
Department of Biological Sciences, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
33
Biology Department, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, Minnesota, United States of America.

Abstract

Mycobacteriophages--viruses of mycobacterial hosts--are genetically diverse but morphologically are all classified in the Caudovirales with double-stranded DNA and tails. We describe here a group of five closely related mycobacteriophages--Corndog, Catdawg, Dylan, Firecracker, and YungJamal--designated as Cluster O with long flexible tails but with unusual prolate capsids. Proteomic analysis of phage Corndog particles, Catdawg particles, and Corndog-infected cells confirms expression of half of the predicted gene products and indicates a non-canonical mechanism for translation of the Corndog tape measure protein. Bioinformatic analysis identifies 8-9 strongly predicted SigA promoters and all five Cluster O genomes contain more than 30 copies of a 17 bp repeat sequence with dyad symmetry located throughout the genomes. Comparison of the Cluster O phages provides insights into phage genome evolution including the processes of gene flux by horizontal genetic exchange.

PMID:
25742016
PMCID:
PMC4351075
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0118725
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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