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Jundishapur J Microbiol. 2014 Dec 1;7(12):e11840. doi: 10.5812/jjm.11840. eCollection 2014 Dec.

Acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in hospitalized children: a cross sectional study.

Author information

1
Research Center of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran ; Department of Medicine, Qom University of Medical Sciences and Health services, Qom, IR Iran.
2
Research Center of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.
3
ENT-Head and Neck Surgery Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Viral acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of morbidity in childhood and leads to hospitalization in developed countries, such as Iran.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and viral types (rotavirus, adenovirus, human parechoviruses-1, and human bocavirus) of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in hospitalized children.

PATIENTS AND MATERIALS:

This was a across-sectional prospective study performed at the Pediatric Department of Rasoul Hospital, Tehran, Iran (2009-2011) on 80 hospitalized children with viral AGE. All Stool samples were collected on viral transport media. Human bocavirus (HBoV) was detected using the Real-time PCR TaqMan method. Molecular detection of human parechovirus type 1 (HPeV-1) RNA in stool samples was done using a specific nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Rota and adeno virus antigens were sought by rapid chromatographic tests. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

RESULTS:

Fever was determined in 47.5% of cases (38), nausea and vomiting in 42.5% (34), respiratory symptoms in 16.3% (13), abdominal pain in 76%. Duration of diarrhea was 1-30 days (mean = 6.3 + 4.3 days). No dehydration was observed in 43.5% of subjects, mild dehydration in 33.8%, moderate dehydration in 17.5% and severe dehydration in 5% of cases. Positive rotavirus was found in 48.8% of cases (39), adenovirus in 20% (16), HBoV in 8% (6) and HPeV-1 in 23.2% (19), and adeno and rotaviruses co-infection in 6% (4). The frequency of positive HBoV was significantly lower than adeno and rotaviruses infection (P value = 0.0001). Rotavirus was more frequent in males (P value = 0.003) and in young children (17.49 months vs. 21.44 months) [P value = 0.03, CI = -13.4, 5.5]. Rotavirus infection was related to the degree of dehydration (P value = 0.001) but was not related to the presence of vomiting or fever (P value > 0.5).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study indicates that viral agents, especially rotavirus (48.8%), HPeV-1 (23.2%) and adenovirus (20%) are the most important causes for viral AGE in children while HBoV (8%) is infrequent during childhood. Determination of various viral pathogens of AGE is very important in planning diarrhea disease control strategies in our country where rotavirus vaccination in not routinely used.

KEYWORDS:

Diarrhea; Gastroenteritis; Rotavirus

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