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Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2015;2015:579675. doi: 10.1155/2015/579675. Epub 2015 Feb 9.

Blue-violet light irradiation dose dependently decreases carotenoids in human skin, which indicates the generation of free radicals.

Author information

1
Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

In contrast to ultraviolet and infrared irradiation, which are known to facilitate cutaneous photoaging, immunosuppression, or tumour emergence due to formation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species, potentially similar effects of visible light on the human skin are still poorly characterized. Using a blue-violet light irradiation source and aiming to characterize its potential influence on the antioxidant status of the human skin, the cutaneous carotenoid concentration was measured noninvasively in nine healthy volunteers using resonance Raman spectroscopy following irradiation. The dose-dependent significant degradation of carotenoids was measured to be 13.5% and 21.2% directly after irradiation at 50 J/cm² and 100 J/cm² (P < 0.05). The irradiation intensity was 100 mW/cm². This is above natural conditions; the achieved doses, though, are acquirable under natural conditions. The corresponding restoration lasted 2 and 24 hours, respectively. The degradation of cutaneous carotenoids indirectly shows the amount of generated free radicals and especially reactive oxygen species in human skin. In all volunteers the cutaneous carotenoid concentration dropped down in a manner similar to that caused by the infrared or ultraviolet irradiations, leading to the conclusion that also blue-violet light at high doses could represent a comparably adverse factor for human skin.

PMID:
25741404
PMCID:
PMC4337113
DOI:
10.1155/2015/579675
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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