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Hepat Mon. 2014 Dec 27;15(1):e20014. doi: 10.5812/hepatmon.20014. eCollection 2015 Jan.

HBV vaccination status and response to hepatitis B vaccine among Iranian dentists, correlation with risk factors and preventive measures.

Author information

1
Dental Research Center, Dentistry Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.
2
Dental Research Center, Dentistry Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran ; Orthodontic Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.
3
Middle East Liver Diseases Center (MELD Center), Tehran, IR Iran.
4
Research Center for Caries Prevention, Dentistry Research Institute, Department of Community Oral Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.
5
Hepatitis B Molecular Laboratory, Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies showed that HBV vaccination and consequent level of antibody are not completely adequate among dentists despite performance of highly exposure prone procedures.

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of the study were to evaluate the levels of responsiveness to HBV vaccine and to determine the occupational factors associated among dental staff.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In total, 1612 dental health care workers were recruited. The level of anti-HBs was tested using a commercially enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Data on demographic, risk factors associated with dental practice and level of protective procedures and occupational exposure aspects were collected through self-reported questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Of 1538 vaccinated individuals, 55 (3.7%), 126 (8.4%) and 1309 (87.9%) had received one, two and full three doses of vaccine, respectively. One-hundred-seventy-six (11.5%) were nonimmune (anti-HBs < 10 IU/mL) and 1362 (88.5%) were immune (anti-HBs > 10 IU/ mL). 392/542 (72.3%) of dentists who received their third dose of vaccination less than five years before the commencement of study were completely immune compared to those who had completed all three recommended doses in a longer period (308/491, 64.3%) (P = 0.001). Fifty-eight (3.59%) of participants did not receive any HBV vaccine at all; however, they had positive results for anti-HBs, indicating a past HBV infection. Statistically, the levels of anti-HBs were significantly associated with gender, age, duration of dental practice engagement and regularly use of mask, glasses and shield.

CONCLUSIONS:

Since dental care workers have a high risk of exposure to hepatitis virus, they should be advised to receive hepatitis B vaccine and it should be confirmed if they have acquired immunity to HBV by testing the level of anti-HBs.

KEYWORDS:

Dentists; Hepatitis B Vaccines; Infection Control

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