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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015 May;24(5):842-53. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1333. Epub 2015 Mar 3.

High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Cervical Cancer Prevention in Britain: Evidence of Differential Uptake of Interventions from a Probability Survey.

Author information

1
Research Department of Infection and Population Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. c.tanton@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance & Control (CIDSC), Public Health England, London, United Kingdom.
3
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England, London, United Kingdom.
4
Research Department of Infection and Population Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
5
Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
6
Research Department of Infection and Population Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. NatCen Social Research, London, United Kingdom.
7
Centre for Sexual and Reproductive Health Research, Department of Social and Environmental Health Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
8
Sexually Transmitted Bacteria Reference Unit, Public Health England, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The third British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) provides an opportunity to explore high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and uptake of cervical screening and HPV vaccination in the general population.

METHODS:

Natsal-3, a probability sample survey of men and women ages 16 to 74, resident in Britain, interviewed 8,869 women in 2010 to 2012. We explored risk factors for HR-HPV (in urine from 2,569 sexually experienced women ages 16 to 44), nonattendance for cervical screening in the past 5 years, and noncompletion of HPV catch-up vaccination.

RESULTS:

HR-HPV was associated with increasing numbers of lifetime partners, younger age, increasing area-level deprivation, and smoking. Screening nonattendance was associated with younger and older age, increasing area-level deprivation (age-adjusted OR 1.91, 95% confidence interval, 1.48-2.47 for living in most vs. least deprived two quintiles), Asian/Asian British ethnicity (1.96, 1.32-2.90), smoking (1.97, 1.57-2.47), and reporting no partner in the past 5 years (2.45, 1.67-3.61 vs. 1 partner) but not with HR-HPV (1.35, 0.79-2.31). Lower uptake of HPV catch-up vaccination was associated with increasing area-level deprivation, non-white ethnicity, smoking, and increasing lifetime partners.

CONCLUSIONS:

Socioeconomic markers and smoking were associated with HR-HPV positivity, nonattendance for cervical screening, and noncompletion of catch-up HPV vaccination.

IMPACT:

The cervical screening program needs to engage those missing HPV catch-up vaccination to avoid a potential widening of cervical cancer disparities in these cohorts. As some screening nonattenders are at low risk for HR-HPV, tailored approaches may be appropriate to increase screening among higher-risk women.

PMID:
25737331
PMCID:
PMC4435666
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1333
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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