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Saudi Med J. 2015 Mar;36(3):349-55. doi: 10.15537/smj.2015.3.10320.

Relationship between the learning style preferences of medical students and academic achievement.

Author information

1
Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, PO Box 28054, Riyadh 11437, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. E-mail. almogbal@yahoo.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the relationship between the learning style preferences of Saudi medical students and their academic achievements.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was conducted among 600 medical students at King Saud University in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from October 2012 to July 2013. The Visual, Aural, Read/Write, and Kinesthetic questionnaire (VARK) questionnaire was used to categorize learning style preferences. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used to identify the learning style preferences of medical students and their relationship to academic achievement, gender, marital status, residency, different teaching curricula, and study resources (for example, teachers' PowerPoint slides, textbooks, and journals).

RESULTS:

The results indicated that 261 students (43%) preferred to learn using all VARK modalities. There was a significant difference in learning style preferences between genders (p=0.028). The relationship between learning style preferences and students in different teaching curricula was also statistically significant (p=0.047). However, learning style preferences are not related to a student's academic achievements, marital status, residency, or study resources (for example, teachers' PowerPoint slides, textbooks, and journals). Also, after being adjusted to other studies' variables, the learning style preferences were not related to GPA.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings can be used to improve the quality of teaching in Saudi Arabia; students would be advantaged if teachers understood the factors that can be related to students' learning styles.

PMID:
25737179
PMCID:
PMC4381021
DOI:
10.15537/smj.2015.3.10320
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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