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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb 27;12(3):2574-87. doi: 10.3390/ijerph120302574.

The Gold Standard Program for smoking cessation is effective for participants over 60 years of age.

Author information

1
Vascular Clinic, RK, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. mettekehlet@dadlnet.dk.
2
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. mettekehlet@dadlnet.dk.
3
Vascular Clinic, RK, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. torben.schroeder@regionh.dk.
4
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. torben.schroeder@regionh.dk.
5
Centre for Clinical Education, Region Hovedstaden, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. torben.schroeder@regionh.dk.
6
WHO Collaborating Centres, Clinical Health Promotion Centre, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. hanne.tonnesen@regionh.dk.
7
Clinical Health Promotion Centre, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö SE 205 02, Sweden. hanne.tonnesen@regionh.dk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tobacco smoking is more prevalent among the elderly than among the young, and the elderly also have the most frequent contact with the health care system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Gold Standard Program, which is an intensive six-week smoking cessation program, on continuous self-reported abstinence rates after six months, on participants over the age of 60 years in a real life setting.

METHODS:

This was a retrospective cohort study from the national Danish smoking cessation database.

RESULTS:

The database registered 7369 participants over the age of 60 years (range 60-82) and 24,294 below 60 years (range 15-59). Continuous abstinence rate after six months was 37% for the elderly compared to 35% for the younger (p<0.05). The significant variables for continuous abstinence were: living with another adult (OR 1.10), prior professional recommendation for smoking cessation (OR 1.12), being compliant with program (OR 1.35) and being abstinent at end of course (OR 13.3).

CONCLUSIONS:

Participants over the age of 60 years had significantly higher continuous abstinence rates after six months than the participants less than 60 years. It is never too late for health professionals to recommend and educate patients about smoking cessation programs even if they are over 60 years of age.

PMID:
25734789
PMCID:
PMC4377919
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph120302574
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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