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Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2014 Dec;16(4):555-66.

Pharmacogenetics and outcome with antipsychotic drugs.

Author information

1
Pharmacogenetics Research Clinic, Campbell Family Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada ; Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
Pharmacogenetics Research Clinic, Campbell Family Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Science, Ryerson University,Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Pharmacogenetics Research Clinic, Campbell Family Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Pharmacogenetics Research Clinic, Campbell Family Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Psychiatry University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

in English, French, Spanish

Antipsychotic medications are the gold-standard treatment for schizophrenia, and are often prescribed for other mental conditions. However, the efficacy and side-effect profiles of these drugs are heterogeneous, with large interindividual variability. As a result, treatment selection remains a largely trial-and-error process, with many failed treatment regimens endured before finding a tolerable balance between symptom management and side effects. Much of the interindividual variability in response and side effects is due to genetic factors (heritability, h(2)~ 0.60-0.80). Pharmacogenetics is an emerging field that holds the potential to facilitate the selection of the best medication for a particular patient, based on his or her genetic information. In this review we discuss the most promising genetic markers of antipsychotic treatment outcomes, and present current translational research efforts that aim to bring these pharmacogenetic findings to the clinic in the near future.

KEYWORDS:

antipsychotic; genetic; personalized medicine; pharmacogenetics; response; schizophrenia; side effect

PMID:
25733959
PMCID:
PMC4336924
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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