Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Viruses. 2015 Feb 26;7(3):899-914. doi: 10.3390/v7030899.

The A, B, Cs of herpesvirus capsids.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 North State Street, Jackson, MS 39216, USA. rtandon@umc.edu.
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, 1462 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. mocarski@emory.edu.
3
Department of Structural Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Biomedical Science Tower 3, 3501 5th Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. jxc100@pitt.edu.

Abstract

Assembly of herpesvirus nucleocapsids shares significant similarities with the assembly of tailed dsDNA bacteriophages; however, important differences exist. A unique feature of herpesviruses is the presence of different mature capsid forms in the host cell nucleus during infection. These capsid forms, referred to as A-, B-, and C-capsids, represent empty capsids, scaffold containing capsids and viral DNA containing capsids, respectively. The C-capsids are the closest in form to those encapsidated into mature virions and are considered precursors to infectious virus. The evidence supporting A- and B-capsids as either abortive forms or assembly intermediates has been lacking. Interaction of specific capsid forms with viral tegument proteins has been proposed to be a mechanism for quality control at the point of nuclear egress of mature particles. Here, we will review the available literature on these capsid forms and present data to debate whether A- and B-capsids play an important or an extraneous role in the herpesvirus life cycle.

PMID:
25730559
PMCID:
PMC4379554
DOI:
10.3390/v7030899
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center