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Am J Surg. 2015 Apr;209(4):597-603. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.11.003. Epub 2014 Dec 18.

Hospital-centered violence intervention programs: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Highland Hospital, University of California, San Francisco-East Bay, 1411 East 31st Street, QIC 22134, Oakland, CA 94602, USA.
2
Youth ALIVE!, 3300 Elm Street, Oakland, CA, USA.
3
Department of Surgery, Highland Hospital, University of California, San Francisco-East Bay, 1411 East 31st Street, QIC 22134, Oakland, CA 94602, USA. Electronic address: gvictorino@alamedahealthsystem.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hospital-centered violence intervention programs (HVIPs) reduce violent injury recidivism. However, dedicated cost analyses of such programs have not yet been published. We hypothesized that the HVIP at our urban trauma center is a cost-effective means for reducing violent injury recidivism.

METHODS:

We conducted a cost-utility analysis using a state-transition (Markov) decision model, comparing participation in our HVIP with standard risk reduction for patients injured because of firearm violence. Model inputs were derived from our trauma registry and published literature.

RESULTS:

The 1-year recidivism rate for participants in our HVIP was 2.5%, compared with 4% for those receiving standard risk reduction resources. Total per-person costs of each violence prevention arm were similar: $3,574 for our HVIP and $3,515 for standard referrals. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for our HVIP was $2,941.

CONCLUSION:

Our HVIP is a cost-effective means of preventing recurrent episodes of violent injury in patients hurt by firearms.

KEYWORDS:

Cost analysis; Hospital-based violence intervention programs; Recidivism; Trauma; Violence prevention

PMID:
25728889
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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