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J Clin Virol. 2015 Mar;64:74-82. doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2015.01.007. Epub 2015 Jan 13.

Epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic characteristics of human rhinovirus infection among otherwise healthy children and adults: rhinovirus among adults and children.

Author information

  • 1Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.
  • 2Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA, USA.
  • 3Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA; Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA, USA.
  • 4Defense Institute for Medical Operations, San Antonio, TX, USA.
  • 5Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, CA, USA.
  • 6Naval Medical Research Unit No. 6, Lima, Peru.
  • 7Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA, USA.
  • 8Office of Curriculum, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.
  • 9Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA.
  • 10Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: emillar@idcrp.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

human rhinovirus (HRV) is a major cause of influenza-like illness (ILI) in adults and children. Differences in disease severity by HRV species have been described among hospitalized patients with underlying illness. Less is known about the clinical and virologic characteristics of HRV infection among otherwise healthy populations, particularly adults.

OBJECTIVES:

to characterize molecular epidemiology of HRV and association between HRV species and clinical presentation and viral shedding.

STUDY DESIGN:

observational, prospective, facility-based study of ILI was conducted from February 2010 to April 2012. Collection of nasopharyngeal specimens, patient symptoms, and clinical information occurred on days 0, 3, 7, and 28. Patients recorded symptom severity daily for the first 7 days of illness in a symptom diary. HRV was identified by RT-PCR and genotyped for species determination. Cases who were co-infected with other viral respiratory pathogens were excluded from the analysis. We evaluated the associations between HRV species, clinical severity, and patterns of viral shedding.

RESULTS:

eighty-four HRV cases were identified and their isolates genotyped. Of these, 62 (74%) were >18 years. Fifty-four were HRV-A, 11HRV-B, and 19HRV-C. HRV-C infection was more common among children than adults (59% vs. 10%, P<0.001). Among adults, HRV-A was associated with higher severity of upper respiratory symptoms compared to HRV-B (P=0.02), but no such association was found in children. In addition, adults shed HRV-A significantly longer than HRV-C (P trend=0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

among otherwise healthy adults with HRV infection, we observed species-specific differences in respiratory symptom severity and duration of viral shedding.

KEYWORDS:

HRV genotypes; Military; Rhinovirus; Viral shedding

PMID:
25728083
PMCID:
PMC4347877
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcv.2015.01.007
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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