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Int J Drug Policy. 2015 Feb;26 Suppl 1:S12-5. doi: 10.1016/j.drugpo.2014.10.012. Epub 2014 Dec 1.

People who inject drugs in prison: HIV prevalence, transmission and prevention.

Author information

1
Program of International Research and Training, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: K.dolan@unsw.edu.au.
2
Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Population Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3
Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Population Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Vienna, Austria.
4
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

In 2011, over 10.1 million people were held in prisons around the world. HIV prevalence is elevated in prison and this is due to the over representation of people who inject drugs (PWID). Yet HIV prevention programs for PWID are scarce in the prison setting. With a high proportion of drug users and few prevention programs, HIV transmission occurs and sometimes at an alarming rate. This commentary focuses primarily on drug users in prison; their risk behaviours and levels of infection. It also comments on the transmission of HIV including outbreaks and the efforts to prevent transmission within the prison setting. The spread of HIV in prison has substantial public health implications as virtually all prisoners return to the community. HIV prevention and treatment strategies known to be effective in community settings, such as methadone maintenance treatment, needle and syringe programs, condoms and antiretroviral therapy should be provided to prisoners as a matter of urgency.

KEYWORDS:

Outbreaks; People who inject drugs; Prevalence; Prevention; Prison; Transmission

PMID:
25727258
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugpo.2014.10.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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