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Ann Behav Med. 2015 Oct;49(5):762-8. doi: 10.1007/s12160-015-9692-5.

Baseline Attitudes About Prostate Cancer Screening Moderate the Impact of Decision Aids on Screening Rates.

Author information

1
Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Suite 4100, Washington, DC, 20007, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The impact of decision aids on prostate cancer screening outcomes has been inconsistent.

PURPOSE:

We assessed whether pre-existing attitudes moderated the impact of decision aids on screening.

METHODS:

Men aged 45-70 (56.2% Caucasian, 39.9% African-American) were randomly assigned to a print decision aid (N = 630), a web decision aid (N = 631), or usual care (N = 632). Telephone interviews assessed pro/con screening attitudes and screening behaviors at baseline, 1-month and 13-months post-randomization.

RESULTS:

Logistic regression analyses revealed significant arm by attitude interactions: Higher baseline cons scores predicted lower screening in the print (OR = 0.60 (95% CI: 0.40, 0.92)) and web (OR = 0.61 (95% CI: 0.40, 0.91)) arms but not in usual care (OR = 1.34 (95% CI: 0.90, 2.00)).

CONCLUSIONS:

The decision aids amplified the impact of men's baseline attitudes about limitations of screening: Compared to the usual care arm, men in both decision aid arms were less likely to be screened when they perceived more limitations of screening.

PMID:
25724634
PMCID:
PMC4959888
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-015-9692-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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