Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Physiotherapy. 2015 Jun;101(2):126-34. doi: 10.1016/j.physio.2015.01.002. Epub 2015 Jan 21.

Development of an exercise intervention to improve cognition in people with mild to moderate dementia: Dementia And Physical Activity (DAPA) Trial, registration ISRCTN32612072.

Author information

1
Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Kadoorie Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK.
2
Clinical Trials Unit, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Campus, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK.
3
Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3FD, UK.
4
Department of Psychological Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK.
5
Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Kadoorie Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. Electronic address: sarah.lamb@ndorms.ox.ac.uk.

Abstract

More than 800000 people in the UK have dementia, and it is a government priority to improve dementia care. Drug treatment options are relatively limited. The Dementia And Physical Activity (DAPA) study is a randomised trial which targets cognition in people with dementia, using an exercise programme. There is evidence to suggest that both aerobic and resistance exercise may be useful in improving cognition. Hence the intervention comprises a supervised part of twice-weekly exercise classes of one hour duration for 4 months, including aerobic exercise at moderate intensity on static bicycles, and resistance (weight training) exercise using weight vests, weight belts and dumbbells. Thereafter participants progress to unsupervised, independent exercise. Aids to behaviour modification have been incorporated into the intervention. The DAPA intervention has been designed to maximise likelihood of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and for delivery in the UK National Health Service.

KEYWORDS:

Dementia; Exercise; Randomised controlled trial

PMID:
25724322
DOI:
10.1016/j.physio.2015.01.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center