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J Health Psychol. 2016 Sep;21(9):2085-97. doi: 10.1177/1359105315571776. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Behavioral reactivity to acute stress among Black and White women with type 2 diabetes: The roles of income and racial discrimination.

Author information

1
University of Connecticut Health Center, USA.
2
VA Connecticut Healthcare System, USA.
3
Quinnipiac University, USA.
4
University of Connecticut Health Center, USA Juwagner@uchc.edu.

Abstract

This study investigated relationships of income and self-reported racial discrimination to diabetes health behaviors following an acute stressor. A total of 77 diabetic women (51% Black, 49% White) completed a laboratory public speaking stressor. That evening, participants reported same-day eating, alcohol consumption, and medication adherence; physical activity was measured with actigraphy, and the next morning participants reported sleep quality. Measures were repeated on a counterbalanced control day. There was no mean level difference in health behaviors between stressor and control days. On stressor day, lower income predicted lower physical activity, sleep quality, and medication adherence, and higher racial discrimination predicted more eating and alcohol consumed, even after accounting confounders including race and control day behaviors.

KEYWORDS:

chronic illness; diversity; health behavior; lifestyle; race

PMID:
25721453
DOI:
10.1177/1359105315571776
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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