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Diabetes. 2015 Jul;64(7):2467-76. doi: 10.2337/db14-1629. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Dietary Intake, FTO Genetic Variants, and Adiposity: A Combined Analysis of Over 16,000 Children and Adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA qibin.qi@einstein.yu.edu nhlqi@channing.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
3
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Addenbrooke's Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K. The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Section of Metabolic Genetics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
5
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, U.K.
6
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, U.K.
7
Institute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
8
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hixton, Cambridge, U.K. Department of Medical Biology, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia.
9
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
10
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Global Public Health, Leiden University College, Hague, the Netherlands.
11
Pediatric Research Center, Department of Women's & Child Health, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
12
Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Physiology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland Kuopio Research Institute of Exercise Medicine, Kuopio, Finland.
13
Department of Neurology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
14
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, and Sachs' Children and Youth Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
15
Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube, Japan.
16
The Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
17
MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K.
18
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Addenbrooke's Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K.
19
School of Life Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, U.K.
20
Human Genetics and Medical Genomics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, U.K.
21
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.
22
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland.
23
Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Physiology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
24
The Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
25
Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands Georgia Prevention Center, Department of Pediatrics, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA.
26
Hokkaido Nursing College, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, Japan.
27
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hixton, Cambridge, U.K.
28
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
29
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Addenbrooke's Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K. The Genetics of Obesity and Related Metabolic Traits Program, The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, The Mindich Child Health and Development Institute, Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, NY.
30
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
31
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA qibin.qi@einstein.yu.edu nhlqi@channing.harvard.edu.

Abstract

The FTO gene harbors variation with the strongest effect on adiposity and obesity risk. Previous data support a role for FTO variation in influencing food intake. We conducted a combined analysis of 16,094 boys and girls aged 1-18 years from 14 studies to examine the following: 1) the association between the FTO rs9939609 variant (or a proxy) and total energy and macronutrient intake; and 2) the interaction between the FTO variant and dietary intake, and the effect on BMI. We found that the BMI-increasing allele (minor allele) of the FTO variant was associated with increased total energy intake (effect per allele = 14.3 kcal/day [95% CI 5.9, 22.7 kcal/day], P = 6.5 × 10(-4)), but not with protein, carbohydrate, or fat intake. We also found that protein intake modified the association between the FTO variant and BMI (interactive effect per allele = 0.08 SD [0.03, 0.12 SD], P for interaction = 7.2 × 10(-4)): the association between FTO genotype and BMI was much stronger in individuals with high protein intake (effect per allele = 0.10 SD [0.07, 0.13 SD], P = 8.2 × 10(-10)) than in those with low intake (effect per allele = 0.04 SD [0.01, 0.07 SD], P = 0.02). Our results suggest that the FTO variant that confers a predisposition to higher BMI is associated with higher total energy intake, and that lower dietary protein intake attenuates the association between FTO genotype and adiposity in children and adolescents.

PMID:
25720386
PMCID:
PMC4876751
DOI:
10.2337/db14-1629
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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