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J Neurophysiol. 2015 Apr 1;113(7):2845-58. doi: 10.1152/jn.00854.2014. Epub 2015 Feb 25.

Distinct neuronal organizations of the caudal cingulate motor area and supplementary motor area in monkeys for ipsilateral and contralateral hand movements.

Author information

1
Frontal Lobe Function Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan; and.
2
Frontal Lobe Function Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan; and Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Frontal Lobe Function Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan; and Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan hoshi-ej@igakuken.or.jp.

Abstract

The caudal cingulate motor area (CMAc) and the supplementary motor area (SMA) play important roles in movement execution. The present study aimed to characterize the functional organization of these regions during movement by investigating laterality representations in the CMAc and SMA of monkeys via an examination of neuronal activity during a button press movement with either the right or left hand. Three types of movement-related neuronal activity were observed: 1) with only the contralateral hand, 2) with only the ipsilateral hand, and 3) with either hand. Neurons in the CMAc represented contralateral and ipsilateral hand movements to the same degree, whereas neuronal representations in the SMA were biased toward contralateral hand movement. Furthermore, recording neuronal activities using a linear-array multicontact electrode with 24 contacts spaced 150 μm apart allowed us to analyze the spatial distribution of neurons exhibiting particular hand preferences at the submillimeter scale. The CMAc and SMA displayed distinct microarchitectural organizations. The contralateral, ipsilateral, and bilateral CMAc neurons were distributed homogeneously, whereas SMA neurons exhibiting identical hand preferences tended to cluster. These findings indicate that the CMAc, which is functionally organized in a less structured manner than the SMA is, controls contralateral and ipsilateral hand movements in a counterbalanced fashion, whereas the SMA, which is more structured, preferentially controls contralateral hand movements.

KEYWORDS:

bimanual movement; linear-array multicontact electrode; macaque; microarchitecture

PMID:
25717163
PMCID:
PMC4416575
DOI:
10.1152/jn.00854.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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