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Diabetes Care. 2015 Mar;38(3):529-37. doi: 10.2337/dc14-2073.

Sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China.
2
MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China.
3
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
4
Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA lgliu@mails.tjmu.edu.cn frank.hu@channing.harvard.edu.
5
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China lgliu@mails.tjmu.edu.cn frank.hu@channing.harvard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

It remains unclear how many hours of sleep are associated with the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes. This meta-analysis was performed to assess the dose-response relationship between sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

PubMed and Embase were searched up to 20 March 2014 for prospective observational studies that assessed the relationship of sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes. Both semiparametric and parametric methods were used.

RESULTS:

Ten articles with 11 reports were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. A total of 18,443 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained among 482,502 participants with follow-up periods ranging from 2.5 to 16 years. A U-shaped dose-response relationship was observed between sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes, with the lowest risk observed at a sleep duration category of 7-8 h per day. Compared with 7-h sleep duration per day, the pooled relative risks for type 2 diabetes were 1.09 (95% CI 1.04-1.15) for each 1-h shorter sleep duration among individuals who slept <7 h per day and 1.14 (1.03-1.26) for each 1-h increment of sleep duration among individuals with longer sleep duration.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies shows a U-shaped relationship between sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes, with the lowest type 2 diabetes risk at 7-8 h per day of sleep duration. Both short and long sleep duration are associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes, underscoring the importance of appropriate sleep duration in the delay or prevention of type 2 diabetes.

PMID:
25715415
DOI:
10.2337/dc14-2073
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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